Bernard Heads to Hall of Fame

The transition appeared as effortless as her final shot at the 2009 Canadian Olympic Curling Trials. But Cheryl Bernard — whose face (and voice) have been recognizable on the women’s curling scene for decades — insists that her new role as a TSN curling commentator did not start smoothly. “It was really hard,” Bernard was saying after a day’s worth of corporate meetings with her charity of choice, Goodwill Alberta. “The first year was tough. I was in such a new position. I didn’t know when I was supposed to talk. What did people really want to hear. The problem is, I came from such a high level of curling that I thought, ‘Well everyone knows that already.’ And I didn’t know what to say.” Read...

Cheryl Gets Call to Hall

Swan City-born curler Cheryl Bernard’s Scotties homecoming was much different this week than her return during the Home Hardware Canada Cup in December. Sure, both occasions were the same in the sense she was part of the TSN broadcast crew alongside Russ Howard and play-by-play Vic Rauter. But, while en route to Grande Prairie earlier this week, Bernard received word that she was one of 10 inductees being named into this year’s Alberta Sports Hall of Fame. The news was made official on Monday via the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame. “I was surprised and I was pretty pleased to even be nominated and so to be inducted, what an honour,”said Bernard, during a break in curling action on Wednesday. “I think because it’s the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame in this province, (curling) has done so much for me in all the years that I played and all the competitions and all the support, even leading up to the Olympics, so I’m proud it’s the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and it’s a great honour.” “It’s pretty neat (I was named to the hall) while I was up here and it seems I’ve had some good curling opportunities in Grande Prairie.” Read...

On The Rocks: Bernard briefly coming out of retirement before returning to TSN

Cheryl Bernard had three huge challenges for 2015 and she got through all three with flying colours. First, she decided to retire from competitive curling and though it hasn’t been easy, she remains retired. Second, she accepted an invite from TSN to give announcing a shot in the face of scrutiny from a million armchair skips. They invited her back for a second year. To finish things off, Bernard accepted an invitation to climb Mount Kilimanjaro and she got to the top and down in one piece. The not curling anymore part has been hard, Bernard admitted. “I really do miss the game,” she said. “I miss the competing, but I don’t miss all the time and commitment it takes to play at that level.” Bernard misses her friends, too, and for that reason she’s taking a break from retirement to play in this week’s Prestige Hotels & Resorts Curling Classic in Vernon, B.C. For one weekend she will reunite with her Olympic teammates Susan O’Connor, Carolyn McRorie and Cori Morris, with whom she won silver in 2010 in Vancouver. Read...

Winning An Olympic Medal Comes With Great Responsibility

During the many years I trained on the ice, I often thought about winning. Like any athlete, part of me wanted to win for myself. But I also wanted to win for my team, my home town, and Canada. I wanted to honour all the people who had shown faith in me, by earning a medal. What most athletes don’t think about as they’re competing is our responsibility after the big win. I didn’t realize at the time that an Olympic medal would mean I could one day make a difference in the world, just by lending my name to a cause. Read...

Former Olympian returns from charity climb up Kilimanjaro

Cheryl Bernard describes the feeling of summiting Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain, as “out of this world.” The Calgarian silver medallist in curling in the 2010 Olympics recently returned from Tanzania after climbing Kilimanjaro to raise funds and awareness for World Vision. Since Bernard’s retirement from curling last summer, she has worked with charities in Calgary and abroad. “One was World Vision, it’s international and it speaks for children, and the second was actually with Goodwill of Alberta and I wanted to do something local, and that’s speaking out for Albertan with disabilities,” she said. The Kilimanjaro climb was to support World Vision’s projects to help girls and women forced into marriages or “dirty and degrading work, slave labour, technically,” Bernard said. Read...